Jonathan Fields

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In light of Father’s Day, we sat down with Jonathan Fields: motivational speaker, yoga and meditation aficionado, and an awesome father and family man. Some of you may know him as the founder of The Good Life Project, which is a movement that explores what it means to live the good life. Jonathan’s adventures investigates how to live a life full of meaning and intention by way of hosting a weekly web-series featuring unscripted talks with notable artists, entrepreneurs, makers, doers and changers. With a cause like that, his ability to inspire and put a smile on your face is uncanny. We’re sure guilty of that!

Satya Jewelry: What has been the most rewarding aspect of being a father and how has your family helped your journey?

Jonathan Fields: Simple answer – everything. Being a dad is an all-in, every-day astonishing gift. The opportunity to be present in my daughter’s life, to watch her grow from a baby to a beautiful, warm, kind and smart person. To notice the smallest moments and how her lens on the world evolves. To watch her struggle, persevere and then rise above on her own terms. To share hugs and kisses. To walk hand-in-hand. To seeing her become a creative, maker with her own voice. To dancing horribly, goofily, dad-like, when nobody else is looking. To be constantly reminded that you’re “in service of” and feel immense gratitude. And, of course, to ride along on this journey of discovery with the straight-up coolest woman on the planet, my wife. So, truth is, at least for me, it’s not about any one “most rewarding” thing, it’s about the fabric we eave together.

SJ: You’re the pioneer of The Good Life Project. What made you start that level of conversation?

JF: Good Life Project started largely as a personal quest. I wanted to better understand what it meant to live well in the world. So I began to seek out people to learn from and figured, “hey, why not bring others along for the journey.”  We began filming and airing the web-series in summer 2012. Then, in May 2013, we launched the Good Life Project Radio podcast on iTunes and just this month, we’re about to start producing twice a week podcasts independent of the web-series. It’s really interesting to see how fast the podcast is growing. To be honest, I’ve been amazed at how powerful the response has been. My sense is that it’s tapping into something fairly deep. The show is raw, real, unscripted and in-depth. It shares stories of people who’ve struggled and won. Sometimes they’re big names, but it’s equally important to feature every heroes, people who we can see ourselves in and learn from. I want you to be able to look at any dozen people and say “if they can do it, so can I.” And I also have a commitment to feature both women and men equally over time.

Then the education side of the venture is all about coming together with like-minded people, connecting around shared values, having fun and learning a ton.

We’re actually about to announce our biggest event ever, Camp GLP, which is a 4-day “summer camp for grown-ups meets TED-like talks and Good Life workshops” in September. It’s going to be amazing. And I feel incredibly blessed to be building this venture with my wife and a small team of people who are committed to the cause and can’t get enough of each other!

SJ:  What would you say is your life’s mantra?

JF: Make. Love. Laugh. Give.

SJ: Where do you find your day-to-day inspiration and how does that impact your craft?

JF: Simple things. Beyond love and family, nature is a huge source of inspiration. Which is kind of funny because I live in the glorious catastrophe that is New York City! But I grew up on the water, the end of my block was the bay and that’s where I go when I really want to reconnect to Source.  My daily meditation practice is also akin to opening an “inspiration vein.” It’s not unusual for me to grab a pencil after my morning practice and start madly scribbling to capture all the ideas that come through stillness.

SJ: 5. What do you find in common with the participants of the Good Life Project and yourself?

JF: Shared values and aspirations. One of the things I did fairly early on was craft the Good Life Project Living Creed and then share it publicly on our website. This pretty much laid out my belief system. It’s become a strong point of connection with a lot of our community. You tend to read it and say “heck yeah!” or “no way.” There’s not much middle ground. And that’s a good thing.

To get more information about Jonathan and his movement, visit his website HERE.